close
close

Acid condensate leak in Grande Prairie County

“There were several small leaks and we were able to stop those small leaks. After sealing the leaks, we worked with the business owner to offload the product from the trailer into vacuum trucks so the truck could be turned around by the tow truck and taken off the highway.”

Article content

Motorists were asked to avoid Emerson Trail and Range Road 94 yesterday afternoon due to an acid condensate leak resulting from a tank rollover.

Advertisement 2

Article content

The Grande Prairie Regional Fire Department responded to the scene and reported no injuries. They announced that the spill posed no immediate danger to the public.

The truck has now been taken off the road.

Condensate is a byproduct of the oil field drilling process. It could contain crude oil, gases and possibly water, said Jason Nesbitt, deputy fire chief.

Some of the raw condensate may contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S), making it acidic. This can be extremely dangerous and fatal.

At 10 p.m. that day, a successful transfer of acid condensate by crews of incendiary materials was reported, and the scene was turned over to the trucking company, which has not been named, and Alberta Environment “to ensure remediation of the spill site.” is complete.”

Article content

Advertisement 3

Article content

Road users were advised to continue to approach the area with caution and drive slowly, following the directions of signaling personnel who remained on site until the tanker was removed.

An acid condensate spill in Grande Prairie County on June 3, 2024 required a hazardous materials response.
An acid condensate spill in Grande Prairie County on June 3, 2024 required a hazardous materials response. Photo by DELIVERED. /DAILY HERALD TRIBUNE

The incident was a single-vehicle rollover, Nesbitt said.

The most important thing during the Hazmat protocol is identifying the product, determining if anything is leaking and providing various options for containment, response and cleanup, he added.

“For this particular one it was immediately identified as condensate. The driver was out of the vehicle, was able to walk to the ambulance and we were then able to determine that the condensate did have an acidic content and that it was leaking from the trailer, but not in large quantities.”

Advertisement 4

Article content

Nesbitt estimates that about 50 gallons of product leaked from the truck.

While he didn’t have specific parts per million measurements of the product, no measurements were actually far away from the vehicle. “It wouldn’t affect anyone outside the scene.”

“We don’t specifically test the product to see how many parts per million it is. As it spreads into the air, it will change. As it enters the air and releases gases and mixes with the air, the parts per million (PPM) will decrease. But as you get closer to the source, that concentration increases.”

One thousand to 2,000 ppm means almost instant death, and long-term exposure of two to five ppm can cause a variety of symptoms, such as respiratory problems, sleep loss and headaches. 50 to 100 can cause respiratory attacks and pink eye.

Advertisement 5

Article content

The acidic condensate did not enter the groundwater and they believe most of the product remained on the sidewalk.

Fire equipment arrives on scene, assesses the situation and calls for assistance from hazmat technicians with higher levels of training and equipment.

“There were several small leaks and we were able to stop those small leaks. After sealing the leaks, we worked with the business owner to offload the product from the trailer into vacuum trucks so the truck could be turned around by the tow truck and taken off the highway.”

The transport company is ultimately responsible for the cleaning and the emergency plan.

“Our job is to stop the emergent nature of the problem. We will stop or repair the leak, remove the threat to life safety, assist with the transfer of products as necessary, try to minimize any risk to the public, and once that is done, the cleanup will begin again. the sender.”

Article content